Tag Archives: buckinghamshire

Events in the Chilterns – 2012

The Easter weekend kicks off a season of events across the Chilterns. The list below attempts to capture some of the largest events in our area, with a focus on those celebrating locally produce food and goods. Leave a comment if you know of an event not listed below.

Calendar of events

April

Chilterns Easter Festival of Food & Drink, Great Missenden – Fri 6 – Mon 9 April

Cheese Makers’ Market, Old Beaconsfield – Sat 14 April

May

Artists and Makers’ Fair, Waddesdon Manor – Sat 5th and Sun 6th May

Rickmansworth Canal Festival - Sat 19 & Sun 20 May

Marlow May Fayre - Sat 26th May

June

Hertfordshire County Show - Sat 2nd & Sun 3rd June

Chenies & Latimer Diamond Jubilee Celebration - Mon 4th June

Marlow Town Regetta & Festival - 9 & 10 June

July

Tringe Comedy Festival, Tring, 1 – 21 July

Penn Street Beer Festival – Fri 13 – Sun 15 July

September

Chalfont St Giles Show - Sat 8 September

Berkofest, Berkhamsted, Sat 15 September

Kop Hill Climb, Princes Risborough – Sat 22 & Sun 23 September

Thame Food Festival - Sat 29 September

Other listings for events around the Chilterns

The following websites offer a more comprehensive listing of events, including museum activities and local events:

Visit Buckinghamshire Events

Herts Direct Events

Enjoy Hertfordshire Events

Amersham What’s on noticeboard

Aylesbury Vale Events

BucksFreePress Events

Watford Observer Events

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Walk in the woods

Wendover Woods was my destination on the latest in a series of days out walking in the Chilterns. I find Wendover a very pleasant village, within easy reach of the two highest points of the Chilterns and a high street lined with independent and specialists shops. One of the village’s highlights is the wonderfully helpful and friendly tourist information office; well worth visiting for maps and local knowledge before embarking on a walk in the area.

The Ridgeway through Wendover Woods

My walk is the latest of several forays into the Chilterns to explore the nature and landscape on our doorstep. My last big walk followed the ancient Ridgeway track from Wendover over the hills to Princes Risborough. It was an excellent route for views, taking in Coombe, Pulpit and Whiteleaf Hills, all commanding fine panoramas over the Chilterns, Vale of Aylesbury and beyond. Continue reading

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Wendover & Gerrards Cross

Today we had something of a two centre day trip. The morning consisted of an antiques hunt in Wendover. Well, less of a hunt and more of a browse, really. Wendover seems to have carved out something of a local niche as a antiques centre, boasting a couple of large rambling buildings stuffed full of antiques in every corner. There’s also a military art gallery we visited on our last trip – paintings of WWII fighters and bombers – you know the kind of thing.

We visited the two main antique shops and from the second emerged with a bugle; a trapping that is becoming an almost inevitable purchase on one of our days out. Tara is now amassing something of a collection of the things.

A third stop in Wendover was that of the chocolaterie we’d eyed up on our visit last year. Although Wendover is a pleasant town, the weather was biting and damp, making a stop off for hot drinks and food and welcome and, we felt, a rather necessary requirement, although deterring further exploration of the area.

Putting off a more extensive wander around Wendover for a warmer month, we set off on a largely diagonal route across the area to Gerrards Cross on the A413. Gerrards Cross (GX) is a town we know very little about, other than we’d identified it having a cinema, which struck us as unusual, given it’s rather modest size (a population of some 7,000, according to Wikipedia).

Again we had a curtailed wander around the shopping streets of GX due to the weather, which offered a few nice looking cafes and a Cafe Rouge, although not a huge amount of great interest otherwise. There was a great amount of work going on over the railway line, where the ill-fated attempt in 2005 to build a Tesco over a tunnel has seemingly been restarted. There’s apparently a common, but again, it will have to wait for the summer months.

We spent the afternoon in the warmth of the town’s rather diddy Odeon cinema. Although there was a large half-term audience, they were all impressively well behaved, which perhaps reflects well on the purportedly well-heeled inhabitants of this area; one of the priciest outside of London, no less.

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Bedford Arms, Chenies and its environs (including potholes)

For this week’s Sunday lunch jaunt we headed off to Chenies, another picturesque rural village in the Buckinghamshire countryside, all but equidistant between Rickmansworth, Amersham and Chesham if the signpost in town is to believed. The Bedford Arms is a little way off the A404, so easily reached, which is more than can be said for some of the currently seriously pot-holed back roads we later discovered when exploring more of the area.

But first to the food. The Bedford Arms had received a good write up and certainly lived up to expectations. We had a seat reserved in the bar as the restaurant was already fully booked. It has nice period features with some modern stylings too. Service was fine although the food took a while, which was, to be fair, peak Sunday lunch time. Fortunately the food was more than worth the wait. The Roast Beef was absolutely delicious; every bite a pleasure. Tara’s black sea bream was the same. The dessert – we both opted for the marble cheesecake – also hit that spot. That makes it two weekends in a row where we’ve come across top notch country pubs for food.

We had a quick walk around Chenies village and like many of the villages in the area it’s a beautifully picturesque corner of the world. Period buildings, a village green, winding country lanes; just what you’d hope for. Unlike Chalfont St Giles last week, Chenies is much too small for a high street, but for the quiet country life it’s all you might hope for. However both villages are located near cross-Chiltern walking trails and the Bedford Arms seemed to have something of a regular clientele, if the partially overheard conversations are anything to go by. We were though, it has to be said, some of the youngest in the pub by a considerable number of decades. Chenies isn’t for those after a racey life; it’s a place to relax, chill and take life at a slower pace. For a Sunday it’s just what you want.

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High Wycombe shopping

Inside the Eden Shopping Centre, High Wycombe
Inside the Eden Shopping Centre, High Wycombe

This weekend’s foray into the surrounding area was to High Wycombe, which along with Watford are the largest towns hereabouts. As with Watford our motivation for visiting High Wycombe was the shopping.

Getting to High Wycombe from Rickmansworth is straight-forward by a number of routes. We opted for what Google Maps promised was the fastest – if not the shortest – route, via Uxbridge Road, the M25 and the M40; an estimated 30 min journey. Alternatively, going via the A404 is around 5 miles shorter, if estimated to take a few minutes longer. However given the current 50 mph restriction on much of the M25 south of Ricky I suspect it’d be a much finer run thing.

The M40 is a none-too-busy and partially 4-lane affair with no complications. The only areas of trouble were the huge and complex roundabout from junction 4 of the M40 heading into Wycombe and the usual navigation around the town. It seems to be that towns of the size of Watford and Wycombe demand complicated and ill-sign-posted routes. Nevertheless the sat-nav saw us alright. Junction 4 could also be avoided by heading East out of Wycombe to junction 3.

Wycombe’s answer to the Harlequin is Eden, and it’s not a bad shopping centre. It’s not as enclosed as the Harlequin – much of it is under cover but still outside, meaning at this time of year you can stay dry but cold. It has large House of Fraser and M&S Stores, although I’m told the fine – and from this winter now famous John Lewis store – is location in an out-of-town location, to the West of the centre. Eden did provide all the shops we’d hoped for, though, and we returned home absolutely laden down with shopping – all of it clothing. Continue reading

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Chalfont St Giles

This week’s destination for Sunday lunch was the Buckinghamshire village of Chalfont St Giles. One of the string of villages comprising the ‘Chalfonts’, its main street is everything you might ask for in a country village: historic buildings, a selection of shops including a bookshop, a clutch of decent pubs and even a village pond.

Chalfont St Giles - village sign
Chalfont St Giles - village sign

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Aylesbury

Aylesbury Market Square
Aylesbury Market Square

The Mule has travelling up the line to Aylesbury, county town of Buckinghamshire. Although not so many miles away neither of us had visited what is the most sizable stop on the line outside of London. At one time served by the Metropolitan and Great Central railways, Aylesbury is now the end of the line and a pleasant hour’s journey out of London Marylebone on the Chiltern Turbo. The countryside is very much interwar Metro-land suburbia until past Northwood when the urban sprawl turns into countryside and stops become distinct towns in the Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire countryside. Passing through the modest Chiltern hills we pass the Boer War memorial atop Coombe Hill upon leaving Wendover. Before we realised it we were pulling into Aylesbury.

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